FAQ
KNOWLEDGE BASE
General
Billing
Services
Warranty
QUESTION:
I live outside of Great Toronto Area (GTA) and areas mentioned on your website, can I still get your awesome service?
ANSWER:
Most likely yes, depending on our availability and how far you live! Please fill the form on the website in the right corner or give us a call at (416) 455 5554

Service Area →
QUESTION:
Can I drop by your office to ask you few questions in person about big upcoming work I have?
ANSWER:
Absolutely! You can find us here:
2578 St Clair Ave W, York, ON M6N 1L8

Contact page →
QUESTION:
I have had a plumber/heating engineer previously; can I request the same attendant?
ANSWER:
Of course - speak to a member of the office and they should be able to arrange this.
QUESTION:
Can I supply my own materials?
ANSWER:
Not normally, no. However, depending on your requirements we might be able to make alternative arrangements. Over the years we have come to trust certain manufacturers over and above others. We use quality products and reliable suppliers in which we are 100% confident. You'll always benefit from our supplier discounts and access to extended warranties unavailable in the open market place. So as you can see - there really isn't any benefit to sourcing and supplying your own materials!
QUESTION:
How accurate are your appointment times?
ANSWER:
We attend >95% of jobs at the agreed time. However, there are times when our engineers hit heavy traffic or the previous job overruns. We will always endeavor to let our customers know if we are running late.
QUESTION:
Can I send photographs for help with the quotation?
ANSWER:
Absolutely. With modern technology and simple jobs that require quoting, often we can estimate a job costing based on a photograph. For example, replacement of an electric shower.
QUESTION:
Do you sell on details to third parties?
ANSWER:
No. The cold calls annoy us as much as everyone else! Your details are only used internally by members of staff to send invoices, quotations, receipts and discuss work with yourself.

Privacy Policy →
QUESTION:
Your engineer was late! Can I receive a discount?
ANSWER:
No. We are unable to monitor all external variables, including traffic, job overruns or vehicle issues. We try and give you a time slot, which is much more than most companies who offer AM vs. PM. Please speak to us if your appointment time is strictly controlled between two timings. We will endeavor to re-arrange and organize our engineer for special cases.
QUESTION:
Do you have a complaints procedure?
ANSWER:
Please give us a call at 416 455 5554 and we will do everything in our power to make everything right by you!
QUESTION:
How much will the work cost?
ANSWER:
The product you've chosen, type of service you require, and even the time of day that you need us will all affect the price of your job. But two thing remains the same – we simply don't do hidden costs & your price will not change even if there are complications with a job and it needs more time and resources to be successfully completed than initially discussed.
QUESTION:
Do you accept credit cards like Visa or Master Card?
ANSWER:
Yes, including American Express so you can collect those points! We use Dream Payments as our Point of sale (POS) solution. Dr Rooter even accepts Crypto-currencies if you invested in Bitcoin or Etherium early on and wish to pay for plumbing services with new type of money!
QUESTION:
Can you process electronic refunds?
ANSWER:
Yes.
QUESTION:
Do you store my debit/credit card details?
ANSWER:
Absolutely not. If you pay via card, the details are directly inputted into our payment terminal.
QUESTION:
What is the fastest way to reach you for emergency plumbing issues?
ANSWER:
Give us a call at (416) 455 5554 or fill the form & we will call you back in 30 seconds or less!

Request Emergency Service →
QUESTION:
Do you provide commercial plumbing and drain services?
ANSWER:
Yes, we had worked with number of companies such as Subway, Mercedes, My Insurance Broker and many others. As well, we had services condominiums, townhouse complexes, number of malls and plazas, industrial plants and factories all around Great Toronto Area.
QUESTION:
Can I get emergency service even on Christmas Eve?
ANSWER:
Yes, Dr. Rooter works 365 days in a year, once in a while even 366.
QUESTION:
How fast can you get to me?
ANSWER:
Usually within an hour. But if technician is in your area, could be within minutes of your call!
QUESTION:
I have a question about plumbing/drain/waterproofing...?
ANSWER:
Please see our Knowledge Base, most likely we covered it, if not - simply contact us directly!
QUESTION:
Are you insured?
ANSWER:
Yes, we are completely insured for all type of work we provide.
QUESTION:
What if something breaks after you had installed it?
ANSWER:
We provide life-time transferable warranty for 25+ years on majority of our services and full support in case something breaks and needs our attention.

Learn more →
QUESTION:
Do you have a warranty request procedure?
ANSWER:
First, give us a call or fill the contact form on our website. We will send our plumbing technician with a manager your way to assess the situation and to find a best viable solution. And finally, let our team to do a job free of charge!
QUESTION:
What is not covered under the warranty?
ANSWER:
Warranty does not cover products that have been misused, tampered with, modified or damaged as a result of accident, lack of proper care as indicated in the owner's manual by the manufacture.
QUESTION:
Is the warranty transferable?
ANSWER:
Yes, our service warranty is fully transferable.
Vocabulary & Legal
Construction & Renovation
Plumbing & Drain
Architecture & Engineering
Plumbing & Drain Terms
Basement and Foundation Terms
It is used to shut off water flow while you repair the connected item.
It is used to shut off water flow while you repair the connected item.
When the toilet is flushed, the circular float will drop and open the ballcock. This results in water being distributed in the tank. As the water rises, the float rises to the level that shuts of the ballcock.
The PRV constrains the amount of water entering from the water companies supply to normalize water pressure for home use.
Capillary action causes porous materials to become saturated, as can be demonstrated by placing a sponge on when service. Capillary action forces water upward against the force of gravity.
The piping is often a 4-inch diameter plastic tube with rows of holes or slits. The drain tile is installed at or below the footing.

Two to 3 inches of clean gravel is placed at the bottom of the tile trench and the tile is installed with the holes or slits porting downward. Two to 3 feet of gravel is then be placed on top of the tile to allow subsurface water to drain down and into the tile.

Ideally, the tile can be routed to a location away from the home where it will drain onto the ground. The water will need to be directed to a sump pit if this is not possible.

Moisture in the concrete dissolves soluble salts in the mix and forms the discoloration upon evaporation. Even cured concrete can be somewhat porous and moist soil around the foundation will cause this action as well.
This base supports the foundation, either a block foundation or a stem wall. However, the foundation may be poured as an integral part of a slab, as in a monolithic foundation.
Evidence of foundation movement can be seen by bulging walls, shifted concrete blocks in the basement and cracks in the mortar joints.

Cracks in the interior walls of the home can also signal foundation movement. Some of the causes of foundation movement are hydraulic pressure, improper construction practices and freeze/thaw conditions in the soil.

While some types of foundation movement can be seen easily, a plumb line or string line may be necessary to determine the extent of movement.

When exposed to water this powdery mix will solidify, a process called curing. Additionally, hydraulic cement will harden regardless of the amount of water to which it is exposed and will often cure underwater. Cement should not be confused with concrete, which is a mixture of cement, gravel and sand. Some types of cement, such as Portland cement, will shrink slightly during the curing process. Other types will actually expand to some degree.
In the case of foundations and basements, water-saturated backfill around the foundation exerts pressure on the foundation wall.

It's often the result of clogged exterior footing drains. Hydraulic pressure causes leaks and seepage at foundation cracks if not repaired.
It does not have a full footing and foundation wall configuration. The foundation is formed by pouring the slab thicker at the edges. The monolithic foundation is used primarily in locations where the ground does not freeze.
When properly installed, the pilaster will help minimize cracking caused by the weight of the building. The height of the building will determine the construction of the pilaster.
The poured foundation is often strengthened by inserting vertical steel reinforcing rods. It is called a stem wall in some locales.
The separation runs down the vertical joint and across the horizontal joint, forming a crack that looks like a set of stairs. Stair step cracks are usually the result of foundation settling.
They are also called tie-backs or tie reinforcement rods. They are placed every 18 inches along the form near the top and bottom of the form and secure the inner plywood to the outer plywood.

They are left in place as the concrete is poured and allowed to cure. Once the concrete has cured enough to stand on its own, the forms are removed, as are the tie rods. Some contractors will fill the holes with cement and apply a tar coating to resist leakage.

Old mortar is removed to a uniform depth and is then replaced with a new mortar mixture. The mortar damage can be caused for several reasons, the most common of which is the entrance water into hairline cracks that damages the mortar through freezing and thawing.
It is the upper surface of what is called the zone of saturation. The water at this level is at atmospheric pressure. Foundations constructed at or below the water table are subject to damage from soil shifting and foundation settling.
They can be formed by leaving gaps in the mortar of or can be formed using small tubes surrounded by the mortar. Weep holes are generally installed above the grade and can be covered with a netting to prevent invasion from insects.